Premier League - Muamba 'dead for over an hour'

Wed, 21 Mar 15:28:00 2012

Bolton club doctor Jonathan Tobin has confirmed Fabrice Muamba's heart was inactive for 78 minutes following his cardiac arrest.

2012 Tottenham-Bolton Fabrice Muamba is carried off the pitch - 0

Muamba continues to show early signs of recovery in hospital, with the player telling Dr. Tobin he feels “fine”.

Dr. Tobin visited Muamba on Tuesday evening, and on Wednesday spoke positively of his communication with the 23-year-old, who suffered a mid-game cardiac arrest at White Hart Lane on Saturday.

"I'm glad to say that the early signs of recovery have continued,” Dr. Tobin said.

“I went to see Fabrice last night. I went in and he said: 'Hi, doc.' I asked him how he was and he said: 'Fine.'

"I explained to him what had happened. That's the sort of level of communication I have had with Fabrice."

The doctor admitted he broke down in tears in the corridor as the reality of the situation dawned upon him.

He explained that medics tried unsuccessfully to revive Muamba for 48 minutes before he arrived at the London Chest Hospital and that it then took another half an hour before Muamba's heart started beating again, after receiving a total of 15 shocks.

"In effect, he was dead in that time," said Tobin.

Dr. Andrew Deaner, a Tottenham-supporting cardiologist, leapt from his seat in the crowd and rushed on to the field to help Muamba.

Muamba's 'miraculous' recovery

Dr. Deaner, who is a consultant cardiologist at the London Chest Hospital, said he also been in contact with Muamba since he regained consciousness.

"If you're going to use the term miraculous, I guess it could be used here," he said.

"I whispered into his ear: 'What's your name?’ He told me, and I replied: 'I understand you're a very good footballer.' He said: 'I try.'"

Dr. Deaner said he, too, had tears in his eyes after seeing Muamba’s sense of humour returning so soon. He recalled how he had been watching the match with his brother when he saw the midfielder collapse.

He said to his sibling: "They're doing CPR. I should go and help."

"Something sort of told me I should go down," he said. "The adrenaline starts pumping when you see a cardiac arrest."

He added: "Looking back, it wouldn't have been surprising if the guys there … said: 'Go away, we don't need anybody else.'"

But Dr. Deaner was full of praise for how things were carried out.

"If you were going to make a film to teach people how to run a complex arrest, this would have been the arrest to film because everything went as it should," he said. "

"One thing after another just went right. He's made a remarkable recovery so far. We don't want to get ahead of ourselves, but as things stand, I think his life is not in danger at this time. His neurological function is looking very good but it is early days."

Eurosport

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