Cow Corner

  • Jim Smallbone shrugged off picking up a five-wicket haul almost a year to the day that he ‘died’ (photo: The News, Portsmouth)

    A senior cricketer is back at the crease, one year after ‘dying’ during a game.

    Left-arm spinner Jim Smallbone suffered a heart attack after just one over of Hampshire’s over-60s match against Sussex in June 2012.

    With three of his major arteries blocked, Smallbone collapsed to the ground while in to bat, where opposing wicketkeeper Mick Tindall saved his life with vital first aid.

    Tindall, 62, said: “I was standing next to him when he went into cardiac arrest. The bowler was about to start his run-up when Jim backed away and then fell to the floor.”

    Smallbone’s sister and father passed away

    Read More »from Cricketer returns to action a year after ‘dying’ during a game
  • England walk off at Trent Bridge, victorious, July 14 2013

    There was enough incident to fill books and tomes in the Trent Bridge Test, eventually won by England by just 14 runs.

    [England win first Test: Report]

    Here we take a look at some of the best images from the five days:

    --

    FIRST TO FALL - Alastair Cook departs to a loose stroke on day one

    THE BIG MAN GOES - Kevin Pietersen follows as England make a shaky start

    Kevin Pietersen of England looks dejected after being dismissed by Peter Siddle of Australia during day one of the 1st Investec Ashes Test match between England and Australia at Trent Bridge Cricket Ground on July 10, 2013 in Nottingham, England (Getty)Kevin Pietersen of England looks dejected after being dismissed by Peter Siddle of Australia during day one of the 1st Investec Ashes Test match between England and Australia at Trent Bridge Cricket Ground on July 10, 2013 in Nottingham, England (Getty)

    THE FIGHTBACK - James Anderson sparks a collapse to drag England back in front

    BUT AGAR ARRIVES - 19-year-old hits carefree fifty from number 11 in debut knock

    SO NEAR YET SO FAR - Agar holes out on 98, two short of being first

    Read More »from In pictures: The ups and downs as England win first Ashes Test at Trent Bridge
  • Trent Bridge 2013: More thrilling than Edgbaston 2005

    What. A. Game.

    Cricket has been forced on to the periphery of sporting coverage in recent times. Last summer the Olympians stole the show – while Kevin Pietersen fell out with his team-mates and England lost their status as the number one Test side, Team GB were busy bagging 29 gold medals on home soil.

    Since then there have been Ryder Cup heroes, victorious Lions, Andy Murray winning Wimbledon. Against that backdrop, our summer game needed something special to return to the back pages.

    What we got, when England faced the unfancied Australians at Trent Bridge, was almost as much action in

    Read More »from Trent Bridge 2013: More thrilling than Edgbaston 2005
  • Five of the best Ashes Tests on English soil

    The first Test between England and Australia at Trent Bridge proved yet another unforgettable Ashes encounter, adding the latest thrilling chapter to the 136 years of cricket's longest-standing rivalry.

    Report: Anderson saves the day as England beat Australia

    Here, we pick out five more of the best on English soil.

    1981 - England won by 18 runs at Headingley

    Sir Ian Botham's unbeaten 149 set the stage for England to overcome odds of 500-1 after they had crashed to 135 for seven after being asked to follow on. Botham's belligerence still left Australia with only 130 to win but Bob Willis'

    Read More »from Five of the best Ashes Tests on English soil
  • Does this see-saw Test have one final twist left?

    It looks as if England have finally got the better of Australia after a wonderful start to the Ashes at Trent Bridge.

    This blog has cast its doubt on the quality of the contest at times – but not for a moment the drama and entertainment. This has been breathless, fluctuating fare, the sort of contest that very few contests other than Test cricket can provide.

    How many times has the momentum swung one way, only to go the other? And that is why, despite conventional wisdom suggesting England have this in the bag, it would be a brave man who bets against a final twist.

    To illustrate the point,

    Read More »from Does this see-saw Test have one final twist left?
  • A controversial incident involving England's Stuart Broad was played down by players from both sides after a gripping third day of the first Ashes Test at Trent Bridge on Friday.

    The blond all-rounder edged spinner Ashton Agar on to the gloves of wicketkeeper Brad Haddin and through to Michael Clarke at slip but, with the Australian players celebrating, umpire Aleem Dar did not raise his finger.

    Broad refused to "walk", leaving the Australian players shaking their heads in disbelief and sparking a huge debate on Twitter about the spirit of cricket.

    England batsman Kevin Pietersen said his

    Read More »from ‘They must be upset, disappointed and angry’ – reaction to Broad not walking
  • Broad ‘cheated’ spectacularly and unashamedly

    Stuart Broad 'cheated'.

    That’s really the only place you can start on this incident.

    If you didn’t see it, let’s begin this piece with a short explanation of the circumstances.

    Broad was 37 not out in a promising partnership with Ian Bell. England were all but batting their way into a match-winning lead when Broad edged a wide ball from Ashton Agar. Brad Haddin let the ball slip through his gloves – but it popped up for Michael Clarke to take the catch.

    WICKET! appeared in the live comments. Sky Sports rolled their wickets tally on from six to seven down.

    Image - Sky Sports

    Everybody saw it.

    Read More »from Broad ‘cheated’ spectacularly and unashamedly
  • KP and Cook – same record, different perceptions

    Back in November 2012 Cow Corner wrote about how valuable Alastair Cook and Kevin Pietersen were to England, and rarely more so than when in partnership at the crease.

    Their partnership record is one of the most prolific and successful in England's Test history.

    When batting together, they have amassed 3362 runs in 54 innings at an average of 65.92 - bolstered by their 13th 100-run partnership in the second innings at Trent Bridge.

    Today's (and last night's) dig moved England from a deficit and real peril at 11 for two to the relatively strong position of a 56-run lead. Pietersen's dismissal

    Read More »from KP and Cook – same record, different perceptions
  • Sky’s Hot Spot gaffe costs Trott his wicket

    England were left to rue a tough lbw decision against Jonathan Trott - and Sky's own Ashes coverage was responsible for costing him his wicket.

    Trott was given out leg-before wicket after a successful review from Australia. Mitchell Starc's delivery was clearly going on to hit the stumps, but there appeared to be a chance that he had got a faint inside-edge with the bat before it hit him on the pads.

    Hot Spot - which uses infra-red cameras to sense and measure heat, thereby establishing whether the ball has made contact with the edge of the bat - did not show anything front-on, but television

    Read More »from Sky’s Hot Spot gaffe costs Trott his wicket
  • Even England fans were upset when Ashton Agar fell for 98

    Ashton Agar had cricket fans agape with a stupendous innings of 98 on his debut - from number 11 - at the age of just 19.

    He broke record after record, finally eclipsing Tino Best's 95, the previous best from number 11.

    As the final landmark approached, even England fans found themselves willing him on. As journalist Kevin Mitchell put it:

    "If anyone doesn't want Agar the Orrible to get a hundred, he or she is bloodless. That said, 100 is quite enough, young man"

    But just as he hooked the ball towards the boundary for his century, he was caught by Graeme Swann in the deep.

    Twitter let out a

    Read More »from Even England fans were upset when Ashton Agar fell for 98