Early Doors

Shock name on list of world’s best paid coaches

Early Doors

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A surprising and frankly hilarious article has revealed that former Chelsea boss Roberto Di Matteo ranks eighth in the world’s highest paid football managers – even though he hasn’t worked for a year and a half.

Di Matteo, who famously led Chelsea to Champions League victory in his spell as caretaker boss, was handed a two-year contract after that 2012 triumph but was sacked soon afterwards, with owner Roman Abramovich apparently waiting for an excuse to dump the former Blues midfielder, which he did the following November.

Many have wondered why the highly-rated former West Brom boss still hasn’t re-entered the world of management since his sacking, but on £130,000 per week (listed as 8.2 million euros per annum by France Football magazine), it’s easy to see why he’s still ‘on the beach’.

That means Di Matteo, for doing absolutely diddly-squat, takes home the equivalent of 317 NHS nurses, 384 brave British soldiers, or the cost of two and a half primary schools in Rochdale.

That contract runs out this summer, so expect Di Matteo to return to management – on a much lower salary.

Current Blues boss Jose Mourinho lies top of the pile for the fifth year in a row, on a cool £275k a week, but just over half of that comes from Chelsea – around 40% of his income is due to various corporate endorsements the media-friendly Portuguese rakes in.

Interestingly both Manchester clubs are paying their bosses approximately the same wage – around £100k per week – ranking them just outside the top 10. Which makes sense for City, whose appointment of Manuel Pellegrini was not necessarily the highest-profile boss they could have gone for, although United fans will argue that David Moyes is being paid £100k per week too much.

The article also appears to disprove the British tabloid claim that West Ham's Sam Allardyce was 11th in the world - he is not in the top 20.

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On the playing side of things, Zlatan Ibrahimovic thinks he is the world’s greatest – but he only ranks fourth in the pay stakes.

Zlatan – who is so important he can get Paris Saint-Germain employees sacked and believes Twitter should change its rules to suit him – takes home a measly 23.5 million euros per annum, 500k less than Manchester United slacker Wayne Rooney. Of course Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo top the pile, with Neymar third.

If you think Zlatan’s relative earnings are unfair, check out Franck Ribery who – despite being the highest-paid player at European champions Bayern Munich – barely scrapes into the top 10, lagging behind the likes of Thiago Silva, Eden Hazard and Radamel Falcao. And, of course, portly, mercurial United man Rooney.

Poor Ribery – who in some people’s eyes should have won the Ballon d’Or after leading Bayern to a famous treble last season – barely earns more than Fernando Torres, who is currently enjoying a three-year slump in form.

If football reflects life, we can conclude that neither are fair.

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All figures from France Football Magazine

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