Early Doors

Mourinho gives sarky interview as assistant loses his head

Early Doors

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Jose Mourinho greeted the television cameras with a classic display of irony – but was his ire justified?

After the shock 2-1 defeat at home to Sunderland – Chelsea’s first in the league at Stamford Bridge with Mou as manager – the ‘Special One’ faced the cameras.

[SUNDERLAND STUN CHELSEA]

But he refused to take any questions, instead laying out his four-point analysis of the match:

I just want to say four things and I'm sorry because if you ask me more questions I'll repeat exactly the same thing.

Congratulations to my players because they gave what they have and what they don't have.

Congratulations to Sunderland, because they won.

Congratulations to Mike Dean because he made a fantastic performance and congratulations to Mike Riley, because what they did during the season was fantastic for the way the championship is going.

Congratulations to all of them and I have nothing more to say.

Ouch. At least he gave an interview – Mourinho has declined to meet the press before his last three matches, ever since he was fined for entering the pitch during the 1-0 defeat to Aston Villa.

It could have been worse – assistant coach Rui Faria had to be dragged off the touchline following the controversial award of Sunderland’s ultimately match-winning penalty.

Faria, who was clearly seen mouthing abuse at Mike Dean as he was restrained by Mourinho, was angry as it appeared Jozy Altidore had slipped and not been fouled by Cesar Azpilicueta, whose mistake had let the American striker in.

Chelsea were also aggrieved that Ramires had not been awarded a first-half penalty after he appeared to be fouled by Sebastian Larsson, while the Blues had several other more tenuous penalty claims rejected.

Dean had a poor game, whichever side your bread is buttered – he should have sent Ramires off after a retaliatory elbow in the face of Larsson, executed directly in front of the referee.

So ultimately Mourinho was correct in his thinly-veiled criticism of the official – but whether the FA see it that way is another matter entirely.

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