Got, got, need… so I’ll draw it instead: Cheapskate fan’s alternative Panini album

The Rio Report

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Got, got, got, need...so I'll draw it in crayon instead.

Filling an entire Panini sticker book can be an expensive and time-consuming business, so one fan has come up with a less costly alternative.

And that is to draw all the players in his book, rather than collecting all the stickers.

It sounds like an absolutely terrible idea, but actually some of them aren't half bad, as you can see on the Panini Cheapskate blog.

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Not all are as solid as those decent Spanish portraits, however. Take Brazil and Chelsea superstar David Luiz:

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In fairness, however, it's a decent drawing of a bad photo. Luiz's bizarre official portrait somehow looks even less like the flighty defender than the scribbled version:

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Andrea Pirlo got a a reasonably decent treatment, though the red cheeks make him look as if he's been living in a cardboard box and swigging wine from a bottle:

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The Panini Cheapskate's descriptions are often as amusing as the drawings, calling Argentina and Manchester City defender Pablo Zabaleta as "looking like a Poirot villain". Brilliant:

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And speaking of villainy , you just HAVE to see the travesty that is Cristiano Ronaldo.

Truly breathtaking - but not in a good way:

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While it does take away a little of the playground magic of collecting and swapping the stickers, it's at least a fairly ingenious way of saving some cash.

After all, the Economist reported recently that it would cost around £449.50 to complete a full album in the traditional manner.

They concluded:

"It is inefficient to buy endless packs as an individual (not to mention bloody expensive for the parents). The answer is to create a market for collectors to swap their unwanted stickers. The playground is one version of this market, where a child who has a card prized by many suddenly understands the power of limited supply. Sticker fairs are another. As with any market, liquidity counts. The more people who can be attracted into the market with their duplicate cards, the better the chances of finding the sticker you want.

"Messrs Sardy and Velenik (The Swiss mathematicians) reckon that a group of 10 astute sticker-swappers would need a mere 1,435 packs between them to complete all 10 albums, if they take advantage of Panini’s practice of selling the final 50 missing stickers to order."

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