The Rundown

Will Wigan join these immortals? The greatest ever FA Cup final upsets

The Rundown

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FA Cup upsets

Saturday's FA Cup final will pit the Premier League's wealthiest club against its poorest.

Manchester City have had hundreds of millions poured into them by the Abu Dhabi royal family, and the team have won an FA Cup and a Premier League title in the last two years.

By contrast, Wigan Athletic were recently valued at £42.8 million by well-respected analysts at Sporting Intelligence.

To put that in some kind of perspective, City's strike force alone cost more than double that sum: City reportedly paid £47m to sign Carlos Tevez, £38m for Sergio Aguero and £27m for Edin Dzeko.

So should Roberto Martinez's men come back from Wembley with the FA Cup, it would mark a huge upset - particularly considering that City have cruised to second place in the league while Wigan are still battling to avoid relegation.

More or less every neutral in the country will be pulling for them on Saturday evening, and if Wigan pull off the miracle, immortality awaits. Not just because the club's name will be etched into the famous old trophy, but also because they will join our list of plucky underdogs who pulled off amazing FA Cup final upsets.

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Coventry City beat Tottenham 3-2 in the 1987 FA Cup final

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Spurs were appearing in their third final in seven seasons, having won the trophy in 1981 and 1982, and were huge favourites against a Coventry side that were appearing in their first ever domestic cup final.

In one of the finest cup matches of all time, Tottenham took the lead in just the second minute of the match through striker Clive Allen, and Coventry had to equalise twice to get back on level terms when they looked dead and buried.

The match went into extra-time, and an own goal from Gary Mabbutt gave Coventry a dramatic victory as Ray Clemence was beaten in the Spurs goal. A Coventry fanzine remains entitled 'Gary Mabbutt's Knee' in tribute to the winner.

Ironically, less than two years later Coventry would fall victims to a very different upset as they were beaten 2-1 by non-league Sutton United in the FA Cup third round.

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Southampton beat Manchester United 1-0 in the 1976 FA Cup final

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Southampton's Mick Channon and David Peach celebrate

United came into the match as the overwhelming favourites, having finished third in the First Division that season and against a Southampton side that ended up sixth in the second tier.

The top-division side, managed by Tommy Doherty, squandered numerous chances as Southampton goalkeeper Ian Turner made a collection of breathtaking saves, and the match drifted towards extra-time.

But Southampton had the last word as left winger Bobby Stokes put his name in history as he received Jim McCalliog's pass and beat Alex Stepney to net the winner and secure the Saints' first major trophy.

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Tottenham beat Sheffield United 3-1 in the 1901 FA Cup final replay

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Tottenham's giant killers of 1901

Spurs were a non-league time back in 1901 - of the third-tier Southern League - and it was a stunning victory for the north London side as they defeated First Division Sheffield United 3-1 in a replay, having drawn 2-2 in the initial final.

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Wimbledon beat Liverpool 1-0 in the 1988 FA Cup final

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It was the classic cup upset from an unfashionable, unfancied side against one of the most dominant teams of the era as Wimbledon beat the newly-crowned First Division champions Liverpool at Wembley.

The result was comfortably one of the biggest shocks in the history of British football as the London side won the cup for the first and only time in their history, with Laurie Sanchez heading the game's only goal in the first half.

The match was also memorable for the first ever penalty save in an FA Cup final as Dave Beasant palmed away John Aldridge's effort to clinch an incredible victory for the Crazy Gang. Wimbledon were not allowed to compete in the Cup Winners' Cup due to the ongoing ban on English teams from European competitions.

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Sunderland beat Leeds 1-0 in the 1973 FA Cup final

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Sunderland manager Bob Stokoe celebrates with his players

Sunderland pulled off one of the great shocks when they pipped Leeds United 1-0 in the 1973 FA Cup final at Wembley.

Leeds boasted a dominant First Division team with 10 international players and came to the match as the cup holders, for their third final in four years; Sunderland, meanwhile, came from the second tier, where they were third from bottom.

No Second Division side had won the cup for more than 40 years, but midfielder Ian Porterfield's right-footed finish proved the deciding goal, with Sunderland goalkeeper Jimmy Montgomery making a string of memorable match-winning saves.

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Cardiff City beat Arsenal 1-0 in the 1927 FA Cup final

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Cardiff's cup-winning team of 1927

New manager Herbert Chapman had made the Gunners the most feared team in the country, and they were overwhelming favourites to stop Cardiff City from taking the FA Cup to Wales for the first time. But Arsenal's hopes were undone by one of the worst howlers in FA Cup history.

Cardiff's Hughie Ferguson found himself isolated after picking up the ball from a throw-in, and with no options available he thumped the ball goalwards from long range. He didn't connect at all well, and the ball trundled towards Arsenal goalkeeper Dan Lewis.

What Lewis did next has gone down in folklore: he got down to the ball well, but somehow let it slip out of his grasp and, in an attempt to recover it, managed to elbow it into his own net. The goal became famously known as "The Howler", and Cardiff won the trophy.

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Everton beat Manchester United 1-0 in the 1995 FA Cup final

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Paul Rideout scores the winner for Everton in 1995

Alex Ferguson's men came to Wembley determined to win some silverware after having lost their Premier League title to Blackburn by a single point, and it seemed nothing could stop them. Everton had been a shambles all season outside their cup run, and after narrowly avoiding relegation it seemed that they would be happy enough to enjoy the day out at Wembley as their reward.

Nobody delivered that script to Everton's players, however: the Toffees went ahead after half an hour when Paul Rideout nodded home a loose ball. United were furious: the players threw everything at Joe Royle's men, peppering the goal for the next hour - but they were denied time and again by some often miraculous goalkeeping by Neville Southall.

It was the first time since in six years that United ended the season without a trophy; but Everton used up two decades' worth of luck that afternoon. They've not won a thing ever since.

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