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Murray wins Wimbledon: What the papers say

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(All pictures via @suttonnnick)

Andy Murray's historic triumph at Wimbledon predictably commands the attention of the nation's press after he ended one of British sport's longest waits.

Murray became the first British man to win at Wimbledon since Fred Perry all of 77 years ago, and the newspapers have reacted accordingly, splashing the Scot's face all over their souvenir editions.

We have pulled together the best analysis from the leading sports journalists and the most eye-catching front or back pages for your enjoyment.

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The Times: The History Boy

Simon Barnes: Arise Sir Andrew, knight of the holy grail. Impossibly, dreamily, unbelievably and yet somehow almost easily, somehow almost inevitably, Andy Murray won the Men’s Singles final at Wimbledon yesterday. Already I long for next year and the opportunity to write: “It’s been a full year since a British male player last won a singles titles at Wimbledon.” Seventy-seven years. That really is an awfully long time. It’s 77 years since Fred Perry won the title here: the last British man to do so. The world has changed beyond recognition — in society, in politics, in population, in wealth, in technology, in destruction. It seemed that the only constant was the British failure to win their own championship. But yesterday Murray put all that right in three coruscating sets of tennis, in which both players served up stuff that would have amazed old Fred. Murray is the first Brit to win the title in short trousers, and he did so in a manner that had nothing whatsoever to do with luck. He won by the old-fashioned method of playing genuinely brilliant tennis.

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The Telegraph: After 77 years, the wait is over

Paul Hayward: Shaking his head and gasping for air on Centre Court, Murray became the first British men’s singles winner at The Lawn Tennis Championships since Fred Perry in 1936. He is also the first British man to win Wimbledon in short trousers. The shame has passed. Frustration has been banished. Wimbledon fortnight is no longer a ritual of hope and despair. Centre Court has shed its inhibitions. We will wrap this day in Union flags, but it was really one man’s victory over doubt and public negativity. To some, Murray was merely a slightly more credible Tim Henman who had the misfortune to be born in a golden era for men’s tennis. Djokovic, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal were all daunting obstacles to him winning Wimbledon, which he has at the eighth attempt. In little over a year he has been anointed Olympic, US Open and now Wimbledon champion: an astonishing revival for the 26-year-old Scot who was widely mocked in his early days for his monotone, his stroppy demeanour on court and his near-misses in big events.

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The Guardian: Murray ends 77-year wait with historic victory in final

Kevin Mitchell: Andy Murray shook free 77 years of unwanted history as we suspected he might, unaware of exactly how it happened and grateful for the affection of a nation that helped him beat Novak Djokovic in three pulsating, ragged sets to win Wimbledon on the sunniest of Sundays. It was one of those moments that will forever be bathed in a glow of palpable warmth, from the crowd and the skies above the opened roof of Centre Court. That the tennis that preceded the most nerve-shredding of final moments varied hugely in quality did not matter. Murray, stretching emotions to the limit, needed four match points to break the resistance of the toughest fighter in tennis and said afterwards: "I have no idea what happened. I don't know how long it was. Sorry."

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Daily Mail: At last!

Martin Samuel: The aura of calm had departed. His mind was racing. Dark thoughts crowded in. Suppose this was not his time, after all? Suppose this was not his destiny. Suppose his legacy was darker, torturous, a stain? The man who blew three match points at Wimbledon. The man who, given the chance to calm the restless spirit of Fred Perry, choked. Djokovic was a fighter. Djokovic was notorious for his resilience, his determination, for sheer bloody mindedness in battle. His comebacks were legendary, so too his feats of athleticism. And there he stood, waiting to receive. Advantage Djokovic. Deuce. Advantage Djokovic. Deuce. Advantage Djokovic. Deuce. Advantage Murray. Game. Murray. It was a blur, he said. A blank. He could not remember the shot Djokovic played — a simple backhand return, into the net — and the precise placement of the serve deserted him, too. He celebrated, he screamed in release and delight, but the overwhelming emotion was disbelief.

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Daily Express: Magical Murray

Tony Banks: The moment British sport has waited for so many painful years was finally realised at 5.24pm on a baking hot Centre Court, as Serb Novak Djokovic put a backhand into the net to leave Murray victorious 6-4, 7-5, 6-4 in an epic final. Murray hailed the final as the toughest match of his career, but admitted he could not remember the moment when he finally won to become Britain's first male SW19 winner since Fred Perry in 1936. It was a weekend of memorable sporting glory, with the Lions' magnificent victory over the Wallabies on Saturday. In 48 hours, it is the start of the Ashes and Chris Froome leads the Tour de France.

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The Scotsman: Champion

Stuart Bathgate: For those of us growing up in the 1960s and 1970s, the thought of a Scot winning Wimbledon was not even an impossible dream. If we contemplated it at all, it was no more than a random whim: the sort of thing you imagine happening only if the whole planet goes crazy and the laws of physics are suspended. Arrant nonsense, no sooner imagined than dismissed. That supposed nonsense is now hard fact. There is nothing whimsical about it. The reality is as solid as the earth below Andy Murray’s feet as he stood and saluted the crowd, champion of his home grand slam.

And here is a selection of the rest of the front and back pages:

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