• General Message Board

  • jon w jon w Jul 14, 2008 21:23 Flag

    Bernie Ecclestone has found a very smart way to drop the British Grand Prix in 2010 for good

    I think that Bernie Ecclestone has found a very smart way to drop the British Grand Prix in 2010 for good. Silverstone can't have it . Donington has to find £100 million and It will take more that 2 years to get planning permission and project management in place for a £100 million project. A Standed run up time for a project of this size is 3 to 4 years and thats going some.This is a very big project and its is in the UK That means 50 times more planning meetings than you would say have in Singapore,Turkey or Bahrain which i think all had about 5 years from Pre-contract to GP contract to race . Looks like its all over for the British Grand Prix what do you think ?

    SortNewest  |  Oldest  |  Most Replied Expand all replies
    • I think you got it in one, jon! Even with ambitions/intentions of filling a 20 GP per season calendar Bernie has plenty contenders for the slots who, as you say, can come up with the planning, infrastructure, cash and completion more easily than Donnington or indeed any location in any 'developed' Western beurocracy. But the more sites in the running to pressure the rest the better and Silverstone was no longer a viable 'pressure point', they were going nowhere fast. So enter Donnington, whether or not a GP is ever realised there the possibilty of one ups the ante for the other contenders. It's that simple.
      And pg, someone somewhere along the line will stand to make a packet if 'they' can pull off the Donnington thing. It's just an 'if' but because of the possible killing to be made and the fact that it's not easy (otherwise anyone could do it) then it's worth a throw, big bucks are at stake. Also simple as that.

      • 2 Replies to Petrus
      • Petrus, I think you've been reading to many Agatha Christie books, that or your in the sack.

        How is it that life is such a conspiracy? I know you don't like rich people and power, think their all stupid and relish in their errors, at least according to your posts.

        Business is not a conspiracy, while there certainly are alliances, when more then one party is after the same thing just because neither side comes forward with the ABC's of their plan, doesn't mean that there up to no good.

      • Petrus, I think you've been reading to many Agatha Christie books, that or your in the sack.

        How is it that life is such a conspiracy? I know you don't like rich people and power, think their all stupid and relish in their errors, at least according to your posts.

        Business is not a conspiracy, while there certainly are alliances, when more then one party is after the same thing just because neither side comes forward with the ABC's of their plan, doesn't mean that there up to no good.

    • There seems to be a sense of mystery about who's financially behind the Donnington development.

      What if BE is the money behind the scenes?

      Could you see any of the obstacles put in the way of the development becoming a problem?

      If BE is behind the plans, he would get approval to race at Donnington if the garages were all portacabins and the grandstand was just a plan on paper.

    • PG, you could be right, since none of us have crystal balls and it's just an opinion. But JPMorgan and Lehman Brothers are more than all that.

      Given the A-B purchase by InBev I see a number of interesting scenarios possible. But BE is a puppet, as far as I can see.

    • PG, you could be right, since none of us have crystal balls and it's just an opinion. But JPMorgan and Lehman Brothers are more than all that.

      Given the A-B purchase by InBev I see a number of interesting scenarios possible. But BE is a puppet, as far as I can see.

    • S A - I hope you're right, but I don't think anyone has strings strong enough to pull Bernie around where he doesn't want to go.

      In my opinion, unless something seriously strange has happened, the only people with any sway over Bernie are the dollar billionaires in the Eastern Bloc and the Middle East.

    • If Donington are not prepared in time then the option will be back to Silverstone, the precedent for this was Brands Hatch, when they acquired the rights. They also had huge plans, but in the end a group hoping to capitalise, had to pay Silverstone to take it on as the planning permissions never materialised!
      As Donington has a ten year contract, they will have time to prepare, however, the GP may take place at S'stone for a year or two more until D'ton come up to speed. Silverstone had 5 yrs to get their shit sorted, and the taxpayer stumped up for a new motorway as well, so Bernie had a case for getting impatient, so I think the race will be with us for a long time yet.

      • 1 Reply to achilles
      • Achillies, Brands never paid Silverstone to take the GP because Octagon Motorsport owned Silverstone at the time. In fact Silverstone still use the Octagon logo. Brands got the contract for th GP when it was run under the BHL banner. Then Miss Foulston sold to Octagon.

        Planning permission was granted by Sevenoaks District Council (12 votes to 6 as I remember) and Kent County Council. It was the Department of the Environment that caused the plans to be changed by calling the plans in because 6 locals complained and accused local councillors of taking bribes by accepting free season passes (that all residents are entitled to) from Brands.

        By the time the DofE got its act together Octagon had bought Silverstone and it was decided to keep the race there rather than ruin another great British circuit

      • Bernie has actually been quoted as saying that if Donington aren't ready in time, Britain will lost the GP, so I wouldn't bank on Silverstone getting the race back. I think we're quite wrong to assume that any country is safe.

        Then again, does anyone believe Bernie, whatever he says ?

    • It doesn't add up for me either, jon.
      However - it obviously does for Bernie :-)

      I still can't believe the Donington owners are as naiive as they look in this, so there must be something in it for them.

    • BE might have been born at night, but it was not last night.

      Jon W this just demonstrates how these boys are playinh chess while all others are playing checkers.

      What I don't understand is why would or what benefit is there in droping the British Grand Prix? I mean why not drop an event that has not preformed, from a revenue expectation, like the US Grand Prix at INDY? or add another event if they can, certainly there is room, running evert two weeks.

      There is a side here that if Silverstone has not kept up with the improvements necessary to meet the demands of F1, then someone else should have a shot at it. They must have known there was a chance they could lose the event. And with the international aspect of F1, if there was no place else than Silverstone capable of handling such an event, that the event could be lost to another country?

      In keeping with the chess theory, where might another landing place be for F1? That might be the best approach to predict BE's potential reasons and posturing.

      The loss of the economic impact of the event is probably worth a closer look and today, losses of this magnitude are very impactful. Even though INDY from an event perspective was not all that great and even the fact the track has 2 really major events, IRL's (INDY 500, biggest motorsport event in the world), and NASCAR's (Brickyard 400), a professional basketball and football franchise, plus major college sports, the economic impact to the local market when F1 won't return in '09 will be hard to replaced.

      So what is really behind all this?