Countdown: Britain's 10 to follow

Britain won one medal in Turin four years ago, can they improve on that performance at this year’s Winter Olympics in Vancouver? Check out our 10 to follow.

Eurosport

Team GB’s winter athletes won four medals - two gold and two silver - at World Championships in 2009 to place 14th in the relative medal table.

Gold medals were claimed by men’s curling and women’s two-man bobsleigh, supported by a pair of silver medals in skeleton.

Here Eurosport’s experts pick out the men and women who could find a place on the podium in Canada.

1) Shelley Rudman – women’s skeleton

Martin Haven: "The Olympic track at Whistler is the fastest ever built, with speeds over 155kmh (96mph) possible, which poses extra challenges for the athletes but offers some of Britain’s best chances of Olympic success. Torino silver medallist Shelley Rudman, from Pewsey in Wiltshire, is back in peak form, having just claimed gold at the prestigious St. Moritz race in the World Cup. With a sled from Bromley Technology, she has the kit and the talent to make it to the very top, despite a season away from the track, just after the Games in Italy, to give birth to her first child, daughter Ella. Shelley has never been fitter or faster and is certainly among the favourites for gold."

2) David Murdoch (skip) - men’s curling

David Smith: "Team GB’s men are world and European champions so should have a very good chance of winning gold. They’ve had a very average season so far but are just hitting some good form in the lead up to Vancouver, beating the Canadians in a recent tournament in Ontario."

3) Kristian Bromley – men’s skeleton

Martin Haven: "Kristan Bromley claimed a unique triple crown two years ago, seizing the season-long World Cup crown, the European Championship and the World Championship. Since then, he and brother Richard have expanded their Bromley Technology concern, focusing on new sleds for the Vancouver Games. With F1 design talent onboard, their skeleton sleds and bobsleigh designs have proved to be as fast as anything else on the ice and Kristan is peaking at the perfect time for the Games, recently posting the fastest times at the long St. Moritz track. With a further upgrade to the sleds for Vancouver, the Yorkshireman is quietly confident and should be a great medal prospect."

4) Eve Muirhead (skip) - women’s curling

David Smith: "The ladies’ competition is very unpredictable but we have a strong team led by two-time World Junior champion Eve Muirhead and they should have a good chance of winning a medal."

5) Nicola Minichiello/Gillian Cooke – women’s bobsleigh

Martin Haven: "Women’s bobsleigh world champion Nicola Minichiello has endured a nightmare build-up to the Games. In November, she suffered a rare problem that left her with only 20 per cent vision in her left eye. Corrective surgery means that she can now see perfectly again but she missed several vital weeks of racing. She and Gillian Cooke, her brakewoman, are fit and fast and she has the latest Bromley sled at her disposal. Nicola is being coached by the last British Bobsleigh driver to claim an Olympic medal, Sean Olsson, who took bronze in the four-man event in Nagano, Japan in 1998 and the Sheffield driver will call on the immense mental control that took her to the World Championship last February, as she fights to repeat that success in Vancouver."

6) ZoeGillings – snowboarding (snowboard cross)

Nick Fellows: "I think snowboard cross should be likened to short track speed skating in that as long as she qualifies for the final, anyone can win. There’s bumping, barging, crashing so the game plan for Zoe is to stay out of trouble in qualifying rounds, make sure she gets through to the final six and if she does, everyone of those starters in the gate knows they each have a chance of winning a gold medal, so Zoe stands a great chance of winning."

7) Jon Eley – short track speed skating (500m)

Chris Howarth: "Jon had a fantastic European Championships at the beginning of this year where he finished second in his favourite distance, the 500m. He had placed first in every round prior to the final, looking by far the fastest skater in the competition and was heavy favourite to take gold. However, he eventually crossed the line in second place. He will be looking for more of the same sort of form in Vancouver where he will face the world champion Charles Hamelin and the silver medallist from Turin, Francois-Louis Tremblay, who are both Canadian and will have tremendous support."

8) John & Sinead Kerr – figure skating (ice dance)

Chris Howarth: "The seven times British Ice Dance champions are without doubt our best chance for a medal in the figure skating in Vancouver. They ended last season on a high wining the bronze medal at the European Championships and have kept the ball rolling this season by qualifying for the Grand Prix finals for the first time, where they finished fourth. They are now coached by two-time Olympic champion Evgeni Platov, so with him as mentor you know their preparation for the Games is going to be second to none."

9) Chemmy Alcott - alpine skiing (super-G/giant slalom)

Nick Fellows: "Our best chance of a medal is Chemmy Alcott but it will take something very special from her, she will be the first person to admit that she hasn’t had the best pre-Olympic preparation that she’d hoped for. She’s been finishing consistently, particularly in the super G and giant slalom but not as high as she would like to. I think she, her coach Mark Tilsden and the fans would have liked to have seen her finish in the top 10 more consistently. But as we’ve seen over the past couple of years from her, there have been glimpses of brilliance, where she’s won the second run or the training run so our best shot at a medal in the alpine is definitely Chemmy and she needs to have one of those glimpses of brilliance, something needs to go well. We know she’s fit enough, we know she’s strong enough and we know she’s prepared as well as any of the other athletes. She hasn’t quite had the best preparation in the World Cup, she needs a little bit of luck and a little bit of extra speed in the training runs in the downhill and she could potentially then win a medal."

10) Lesley McKenna – snowboarding (halfpipe)

John Clark: "Don’t forget, under everybody’s radar for the last eight years has been Lesley McKenna, since I was in Salt Lake City with her in 2002 when she had huge expectations heaped upon her and she chocked completely in the halfpipe and had a disastrous winter games. However, that season she went on to win her first ever World Cup halfpipe in Japan. She will be competing for Great Britain in the halfpipe which is something not many people know. She’s currently head coach for the Quiksilver team, looking after a bunch of young up and coming athletes from all over the world and that’s given her a much more rounded experience and therefore a much more rounded approach to her own performance."

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